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State College Podiatrist | State College Corns/Calluses/Hyperkeratoses | PA | Company Name |

Larry J. Assalita, DPM

Fellow : American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine
Board Certified
: American Board of Podiatric Medicine
Board Certified in Foot Surgery
: American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery

Total Family Foot Care Emphasizing Patient Education

110 Regent Court, Suite 200
State College, PA 16801
 814-238-0675
Corns/Calluses/Hyperkeratoses

Updated Office Schedule!

 

Corns result from friction and pressure , either against the ground, the shoe, or adjacent toes or bone surfaces. Corns are often more discreet / smaller in size / localized. Calluses cover broader areas, and may or may not have a more centralized core [ in that case, both a corn and callus exist together ] Usually corns are not found in children ( see warts / verrucae / plantar warts ).

Take a look at some of these photos of corns ( on tops, tips and between toes, side of the foot, and ball of the foot ).

corn1.JPG corn2.JPG corn3.JPG corn4.JPG

 

Corns between toes small corn on top of hammertoe joint great toe callus, with new blister corn on little toe

Corns result from friction and pressure , either against the ground, the shoe, or adjacent toes or bone surfaces. Corns are often more discreet / smaller in size / localized. Calluses cover broader areas, and may or may not have a more centralized core [ in that case, both a corn and callus exist together ] Usually corns are not found in children ( see warts / verrucae / plantar warts )

corn5.JPG corn6.JPG corn7.JPG corn8.JPG

corn on bottom of foot ( circular mark from pad patient had around site ) tiny corn, with larger surrounding callus areas small corn, not wart , on sole of foo corn, overlying prominent bone of hallux joint

 

Corns / calluses / hyperkeratoses can be managed in several ways , including combinations of some of the following.

a/ periodically, the painful thickening can be trimmed ( debrided ). Sometimes referred to as Foot Care / Professional Routine Foot Care.

b/ if shoes are not fitted well, style and size changes can be made

c/ if the biomechanics of the foot is at fault, sometimes, rebalancing the foot, can offload pressure and either reduce pain and thickness, or reduce or eliminate the frequency or need for periodic care . This can sometimes be accomplished with simple shoe paddings, or altered drug store arch supports. In some instances, accomodative custom arch supports, or sport orthotics can be used to make significant differences.

d/ sometimes, surgically straightening a toe, removing underlying bone processes is used to reduce or eliminate the problem e/ various protective pads, for use in sport, or elderly patients, or those who cannot have surgery or do not want surgery.

e/Pumas stones, creams and softeners can be used often in conjunction with some of the other above mentioned combinations of care.

 

corn9.JPGNote: "corn removers containing acids or harsh chemicals are not recommended, especially for diabetics or those with poor circulation or other medical conditions. This could lead to infections, ulcers, or worse. Self care with razors or other instruments is potentially dangerous.

If you make an appointment for the care of corns or calluses, we will at the first visit, provide an appropriate office evaluation, and discuss the variety of treatment options available. At that same visit, relief of painful corn or callus symptoms can often be achieved by careful and simple debridement ( trimming away ) of the painful region. Note : it is easier [ and safer ] for the professional podiatrist to do this, since we have the appropriate instrumentation, and can see the area well, and are in a better position to reach the region. Note also : the corn, or callus itself, is "dead skin" and not painful. It is the pressure of this hard skin on the underlying surface of nerves, soft tissue, joints etc, that presses pain in that area. So, normally, this is a relatively painless process, relief is fairly immediate, and there is no need for injections of local anesthetic. So, do not let fear keep you away from some foot pain relief.

corn10.JPGAll Podiatrists are trained at the first professional degree level to do this basic podiatric medical care. In fact, it is this example of one of the many abilities a Podiatrist has to provide quick and significant relief in a simple way, that makes this profession rewarding. While this office has the ability to surgically address these issues, when appropriate criteria exist, we encourage the initial benefits of this non surgical periodic care options and gladly provide this option. We hope you recognize however, that the ability to provide a surgical option, means that you can be certain you receive all options of care, and that together we can help you select the best option for your diagnosis, your circumstances, your job and lifestyle.

 

 
 
State College Podiatrist Company Name is a poidiatry office providing Corns/Calluses/Hyperkeratoses, orthopedic, pain, diabetes, bunions and much more in State College, PA. We also do Achilles Tendonitis, Athlete's Foot, Calluses, Diabetic Foot Care, Flatfoot (Fallen Arches), Ganglions, Haglund's Deformity, Hallux Rigidus, Hammertoes, Heel Pain/Fasciitis, Infections, Injuries, Metatarsalgia, Morton's Neuroma, Osteoarthritis, Plantar Fasciitis, Posterior Tibial Dysfunction, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Running Injuries, Sesamoiditis, Sprains/Strains, Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome, Bunionette/Tailor's Bunion, Tendonitis, Toe Deformities and all work related in the 16801-7966 area and surrounding areas in State College